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have posted and explanations. so i will talk to you very thatly about the nsa, and is something i have been very involved with, trying to rein in the out-of-control nature of what is going on right now with our surveillance programs, and that is something that i have spent, as you have probably seen from the news, a lot of time doing over the past couple of months. doing himsa has been as has been declassified now, is collecting the phone records of every single person in the united states, regardless of whether you are under suspicion of anything, so, in other words, the nsa has a database, and they actually collect every time you call someone. they collect the call that was made. they tell you which numbers were connected, the duration of the call, and they keep other sorts onwhat they call metadata your calls. they have been doing this for quite some time, but it was thently disclosed, and problem, of course, is they are doing it without any suspicion. it does not matter if you have a connection to a terrorist or not. they decided that they have the authority to gather up everyone's
is not a fan of big government, i share many of those worries. i'm asked constantly about the n.s.a. stuff. i don't know enough of what's going on. but i have this guttural reaction where, no, i don't want my data scooped up vs. the analytical counterterrorism side of me saying, i want their data scooped up. there is something to be had there, a conversation to be had there. i just say that, you know, when you have that conversation, you shouldn't let it -- and i don't think you guys do this, but some people i think now are defining the current threat environment and how things are evolving around the globe with the impetus to wrap this up because they want to declare it over and an end to it. s there's a danger that you go too far in your thinking in that and think you're just going to say it's all over with because i don't want to deal with it anymore. the bottom line is our enemy gets a vote. >> we covered a lot of ground. but there's obviously still a lot of ground we could cover. let me thank our two panelists very much. [applause] and thank you all for coming and i hope to to see you ag
-- >> the philosophical objection to all the nsa programs is that you don't want the government. everyone knows that amazon has all of your information. so does, you know, your online grocer who takes your food order every week. this is about the federal government having too much information and too much control over their lives. >> like they don't have it already. >> as a stout nra member, i'm upset to know they may know what i'm doing, how i'm doing, what i'm doing with i many guns. >> where you keep them in your east hampton cottage. >> east hampton, it's ammo city out there. >> yes, i just heard from someone, a concerned viewer that when we say guns, we're not talking about your biceps. >> oh, there you go. >> okay. talking of surveillance. government programs. >> we want to see them today. you have three hours for you to reveal your guns. >> no, no, no. >> this is marketing. marketing is for the consumer's needs. obviously there's a consumer need out there to see the biceps. so we will, as marketers, as journalists. yes, that will happen at 8:00. >> it won't. i promise you, it really won'
of you know is against the nsa program. nsa, health care, immigration reform, it is all on the table for members of congress. what is your message to them? greensboro, n.c., what do you think? >> i am calling about the town hall -- caller: i am calling about the town hall meeting that was played just prior to ,washington journal" coming on and it looked like a representative was playing to the fears of the people in the audience. i am sure that he knew what they were saying, but he was just giving vague information. one person stood up and said that his -- he took his son to the hospital because his son was beaten by a dog and he talked to different people at the hospital and the comment was, get rid of the federal government. instead of the representative addressing his concern, it did not make sense. like anperson, look elderly gentleman, said he was in favor shutting down the government's. does he realize that he is receiving any kind of social security benefits or medicare that that would be shut down, too? the representative did not explain it to him. republicans just look like
the u.s. may be violating international law through its use of nsa surveillance programs. she spoke as a representative of a group that has formulated new principles aimed at protecting people from unwarranted electronic surveillance. speaking at part of an event, this is 40 minutes. >> excuse me, hello. if even could come to the forward of the room, please, you can bring your food, your drinks. leads sit down, we're going to -- please sit down, we're going to get started. [inaudible conversations] like herding cats. so i wanted to welcome everyone to the new america foundation. i'm thomas gideon, i'm the director of technology at the open technology institute. oti, as some of you may know, is an operational think tank that brings many disciplines together to collaborate on improving access to and control of open technologies. in supporting one of those disciplines, the one directly tasked with the research and development of open technologies such as the commercial wireless project, i especially appreciate the purpose of this event and this event series, this wider multicity, multi
to provide temporary asylum to the nsa leaker, edward snowden, or even russia's high-profile arrest recently of a u.s. diplomat who they have accused of being a cia spy and who they perp walked to a great effect. it's not even just russia's decision to ban american couples from adopting russian children. it's also russia's recent spate of anti-gay legislation which has drawn lots of criticism from the west, and some calls that the world should boycott the upcoming winter olympics that are due to be held in russia next year. >> i know that one question that's been raised is how do we approach the olympics? i want to just make very clear right now i do not think it's appropriate to boycott the olympics. we've got a bunch of americans out there who are training hard, who are doing everything they can to succeed. nobody's more offended than me by some of the anti-gay and lesbian legislation you've been seeing in russia, but as i said just this week, i've spoken out against that not just with respect to russia, but a number of other countries where we continue to do work with them but have a stro
on a wide range of issues, including u.s.-russia relations and likely the nsa surveillance programs. indications are that he will make some sort of statement of the top of the news conference and it is likely to be about the nsa. the new york times" says at resident plans to launch new efforts. the president is endorsing a new policy panel to review surveillance powers. independent attorney to argue against the government before the surveillance courts. so some of the things that we're likely to hear but as the resident begins the news conference this afternoon. it will -- as the president begins the news conference this afternoon. after the news conference is done, we plan to open up our phones than hear from you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] afternoon, everybody, please have a seat. over the past few weeks, i have been talking about what i believe should be our priorities for the country. i am focused on the number one responsibility as commander-in- chief, keeping the american people safe. in rece
the nsa, snowden, what's the future of privacy and security issues? guest: this congress is going to take them up. we saw representtive rutchersburger was telling us yesterday before they headed home and they had a meeting at the white house to talk about the nsa that there appears to be an appetite for some type of additional layers of oversight. but we're going to see intel committee members and leadership, both parties on both sides of the building defending that nsa program. they're the people who get to read and see the things that are class fid that the rest of us don't and keep insisting the program is important and needs to be there. it will be a little bit of a fight, a disagreement moving forward. host: rod is next. caller: i had a question about congressman watt and the likelihood of him getting full enate confirmation to head the fhfa and what's so important about mel watt getting full senate confirmation? guest: i haven't been following that appointment very closely. we just saw some real stickler appointments going through the senate. he members of the nlrb, some in the e.p.
harman, and the nsa former nsansel. -- general counsel. this is one hour, 10 minutes. >> the title of this panel, as you see, is counterterrorism, national security, and the rule of law. the tension between what the law demands and what the national defense requires is, in essence, what this panel is about. we are pleased to have one of america's premier investigative journalists. mike joined nbc news in 2010 as the national investigative correspondent. we all know he covered, among other things, the boston marathon bombing and the newtown shooting massacre. he appears regularly on nbc news. he is also the author of new york times best-selling books "hubris" and also "uncovering clinton." go ahead. >> thank you. and i want to thank you again for assembling great panels every year. you get newsmakers and future newsmakers to serve on these panels. last year, i served on a panel with paula broadwell. while i do not expect any of our distinguished panelists to make news like that this year, i think they will all be in the spotlight in some form. to my left, the general counsel of the
the nsa a is not operating these microphones clearly. [laughter] or maybe barack obama is. that's a good point. it's wonderful to be here tonight. wonderful to be here at the steam boat institute. i think it's long past time that the aspen institute got a doze of truth and reality and facts. [applause] and we're thrilled to be part of that effort here tonight. we thought we would do a cup of things. we want to talk about current events, but the most important current event in our lives in our family has been the fact that my dad was bless -- we were all blessed. my dad was a recipient a of new heart a little over a year ago. [applause] and his story, you know, he talked about his first campaign for office when he was elected, and 1967, when i was running the first time was also the first time he had a heart attack, and i've been going back for reasons you can imagine looking at some old news clippings about political campaigns in wyoming, and came across one where my dad was asked about his heart attack in 1978. after he had the attack and decided he was going stay in the race he was int
it is fast and furious, whether it is benghazi, whether it is the n.s.a., you are never getting information. >>steve: some of the president's critics are saying the only reason we have heard about this particular terror threat at our embassies and diplomatic posts throughout the arab world is because in past administrations in the bush years, they never would have made such a big deal out of it. but right now the subtle message is, look, we were able to listen to this particular conversation between al-zawahiri and the guy who runs al qaeda in the arabian peninsula through the n.s.a. program so folks don't feel bad about the n.s.a. program. >> we'll wait and see what happens with this. if there is nothing that happens, we'll have to say you blew contacts, you blew sources and methods. was it to distract us from other issues. you know what makes me maddest of all? where's the media? when i was in the nixon administration, if the nixon administration had not turned over documents, you would have heard about it from every media source. they would have been screaming and crying. in this case th
: we've got scandals to talk about. the n.s.a. at the very least looking at it. then you have the i.r.s., at the very least should we find out why the person heading up that program wants to take the fifth rather than talk. you have the benghazi attacks which ended up with four americans dead and an attack that lasted for hours in which they never got any help. you would think that is a scandal or something that should be examined and we should get some answers. the fact that some people want the answers, others say it is pursuing a partisan scandal. at least if you listened to jay carney yesterday. >>alisyn: we've been listening to the president the past week who has been inserting the phrase phony scandals into many of his speeches and we've been wondering which ones is he referring to. so yesterday jay carney, his press secretary, was asked that directly. amazingly, he included benghazi, which so many pundits said clearly they can't be calling benghazi a phony scandal. four americans are dead. but in fact he did include benghazi. listen to jay carney yesterday. >> we've seen time
broad new powers in 2008. "the washington post" made the analysis after getting documents from former n.s.a. analyst edward snoweden, now congress is getting involved. short time ago we talked with a reporter fouling this story. -- following this story. >> we are joined by jenifer martinez of the hill. why is judiciary committee chairman patrick leahy calling for another round of hearings on the n.s.a.? >> he's doing that in the wake of report that was published by "the washington post" late thursday, that n.s.a. had repeatedly broken privacy rules or overstepped its authority for years. soleil he came out today with -- so lie he came out with a statement today saying he remains concerned that congress is still not getting straightforward answers from the n.s.a., so he hopes to hold another hearing when congress returns to get these answers. >> how bad was this report that the "washington post" published on thursday? > it's definitely pret i damning. ust adds -- it would put the administration in even worse position than it was with the surveillance program. it also calls into question the
because of edward snowden an the nsa leaks. basically information on what we're doing to try to stop the next terrorist attack against americans. this is pretty explosive stuff. >> yeah. i mean this is increasing, the third rail of american politics, "the washington post" obtained new details about what it describes as a black budget for u.s. spy agencies. here are some of the revelations. the u.s. has spent more than half a trillion dollars on national intelligence programs following the 9/11 attacks. that number includes all 16 spy agencies. for the 2013 fiscal year alone, $52 billion was allocated for the program with the cry gettiag most at $14.7 billion as requested. according to the "washington post" despite the massive dollars spent on the programs, the agencies repain unable to provide critical information to the president on a range of national security. threats. also raising eyebrows from the report the u.s. intelligence lumps israel in with hostile foes like iran, cuba, china and russia as a key target for u.s. counter intelligence efforts. it's amazing how much money sinc
the bill barring the nsa from using funds to collect the data records from citizens on the subject and investigation. >> she's my chief of staff. he doesn't just work for me. if you have questions or concerns here in the district you can always reach ben. he is primarily in my grand rapids office. you can find that on my website, amash.house.gov. we have a satellite office in battle creek so if there's something you would like to schedule, an appointment you'd like to schedule if you contact the grand rapids office we can make sure we have someone here to meet with you as well in calhoun county. my district director is jordan bush. he is also a valuable resource. if you want to contact my grand rapids office, feel free to do so. he's always around except for today but for good cause he's not here today. but he is a great resources with any number of issues. i do telephone town halls from time to time. so if you would like to get out those phone calls please let the staff know. you can talk to ben before you leave. as we do those from time to time that gives you another way to stay
obama spoke about a range of issues including surveillance programs at nsa and u.s./russian relations. this is about 55 minutes. >> good afternoon. these have a seat. over the past few weeks thomas i've been talking about what i believe should be our number one priority in the country. building a better bargain for the middle class and for americans who want to work your way into the middle class. at the same time i am focused on my number one priority -- keeping the american people safe. been reminded once again about the threats to our nation. as i said at the national defense university, and meeting those threats we have to strike the right balance between protecting our security and our freedoms. as part of this rebalancing, i called for review of our surveillance programs. unfortunately, rather than orderly and lawful process, the , repeated leaks of classified information has initiated the debate in a very passionate but not always informed way. i held a healthy skepticism of these programs as a senator and as president i have taken steps to make sure that they have strong overs
. >>> the man who helped expose the nsa secrets isn't done. he said he's going to release more documents. what does very? >>> this man could be the largest person alive. he can't move on his own and until now hadn't left his bed in two years but why are we telling this? help is on the way. the king of saudi arabia is bringing that help. we're going to tell you this amazing story. >>> an upsetting story two day care workers fired for allegedly posting cruel pictures on instagram making fun of the children they're supposed to be taking care of. we'll speak live with one mother who says one of the pictures mocked her son who has a delayed speech development. >>> first, breaking overnight an airtran flight forced to make an emergency landing in memphis, tennessee. the plane was traveling from baltimore to austin, texas, when officials say a passenger tried to open an emergency exit mid flight. cnn's christine romans is following the developments for us. >> a lot of questions about the motive behind this man who walked to the back of the airplane and tried to open this door. 120 passengers on board
to nsa leaker edward snowden. my next guest said it's the right direction but can't undo five years the president spent remaking the image into one perceived around the globe as weak. fox news contributor linda chavez. thanks for joining us this morning. >> great to be with you. >> i think a lot of people voted for president obama in 2008 the first time with the sincere expectation his election would make america more popular around the globe. that hasn't happened. why? >> it hasn't happened. the president said he was going to remake america's image in the world. i think a lot of people thought because he did have a charismatic personality, certainly the president himself believes himself to be charismatic, he was going to be able to win more friends for america, that america would suddenly be beloved by all. what the president seems not to understand, what is most important in terms of a country's standing is that you are respected not necessarily liked. so the president's effort to make everyone like us i think has made us look weak. >> so it's had the opposite effect? >> that's e
for a while. russia's decision to grant asylum to nsa leaker snowden appeared to be the final straw. >> major issues were not teed up toing may progress on the level of a president to president summit. >> the russians responded by saying washington failed to develop relations with moscow on an equal base is. >> fed are again alerting local law enforcement across the country to be on the lookout for terror plots in the preplanning stages the message in a bulletin late last night. the fbi and department of homeland security also repeating that they're not aware of any specific threat on u.s. soil. >> syrians caught up in brutal civil war about to get more help from the united states. prident obama has announced an additional $195 million in humanitarian and food aid for the syrian people. that brings the total amount of u.s. aid to syria to more than $1 billion since the fighting began two years ago. the announcement coincide with the muslim holiday which marks the end of the holy month of ramadan. >>> festivities getting under way across the globe. millions of muslims are breaking their fast w
're following on "world news now." >>> nsa whistle-blower edward snowden has left the airport in moscow for the first time in more than a month. awarded temporary asylum by russia. and he's now in an undisclosed location in russia. the white house reportedly furious. >>> strong reaction to russia's announcement to enforce a new law that cwn on gay rights activism during next year's winter olympics. some gay supporters in the u.s. are asking for a boycott on russian products, vodka and participating in the games themselves. >>> one day after another session of record nighs on wall street, traders and investors are eagerly awaiting the july jobs report later this morning, expected to indicate a strengthening job market. >>> in the mountains of northern georgia, rescue crews had to pull two frightened teenagers to safely after a flash flood swept their truck on to a small island. more rains expected in the southeast today. those are some of our top stories on this friday, august 2nd. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >> good friday morning. we have tai filling in for d
to show you this banner headline in the "washington journal" this morning. an audit said that the n.s.a. repeatedly broke privacy rules who has been on this story for quite some time. writes this morning that the n.s.a. overstep its legal authorities thousands of times this year -- host: back to the egypt question about aid. bob is hanging on in manassas, virginia, democrat. thank you for waiting, bob. caller: yeah, we should not pull the funding. if we do, we will support the radicals. the only stabilizing force in egypt is the military. they're western professional folks. they do not -- they're not like a third world country like the folks in south america. these guys are trying to stabilize the situation. they responded because the brotherhood was taunting them. they did overrespond, but the brotherhood after they got the -- that's going on, they went and destroyed 50 churches and christian organizations in egypt has retaliation. they're hiding in the buildings. judah is exactly correct. there should not be allowed to be empowered to the same type of folks who were in iran when they
supporting the ousted president there. repeated violations of privacy rules by the nsa thomas calling for operations of the program. at a state justice in pennsylvania has blocked a voter id law there. this is in time for the november 5 special election. journal," ahington three-hour program for you. our first 45 minutes is looking at politics, looking to you specifically on this topic am a who best represents your political party? the rnc concluding its summer meeting, talking about its future as far as 2016 is concerned. visits to iowa by joe biden. for the first 45 minutes we want to hear from the people that best represents your political party. divided the lines by political party. if you want to give us a tweet on this topic you can send that our way@c-spanwj. send us an e-mail at journal@c- span.org. couple ofurred by a different things. "the wall street journal" has a new writeup about the rnc meeting. the head of the rnc talked a little bit about the 2016 strategy. in this write up this morning, he said -- that ist abt the strategy on the republican side. on the democratic s
-- on foreign-policy, -- this headline from "the washington post" -- -- that is the nsa leaks, the former nsa staffer, edward snowden, the reporter who first worked on that. there will be more on that story in today's new york times. on our democratic line from pennsylvania. pat, we are talking the president's priorities. we have gone over a few foreign- policy issues. what do you think the top priority should be, foreign or domestic policy? the top priority should be foreign-policy. in particular, a complete disconnection from the state of israel, which we are now finding is a nation leading israeli intelligence officers. these are the american equivalent of the fbi director, cia director, who are now creating a state of israel like not to germany. when secretary kerry detained the leading state department ,fficial of the united states the statement was, at least i can go where i want now. host: where are you getting your information? caller: i know this for a fact. there are photographs of netanyahu on the walls. host: how do you know this as a fact? explain where you get your facts from. c
which is the nsa who every three months is going to this fisa court which is a secret court which no one can appeal to. and they're getting warrants to get cell phone records basically every single american, okay? you have an fbi who believes that and has went to court to say that they do not, they don't need, basically they don't need a warrant to put a gps tracking device on your car. you've got an irs whose official position is that they don't need a warrant to check your e-mail. this, of course, is that same irs that has no compunction about using -- abusing their authority. they have targeted tea party groups and so far nobody has really paid a price for that. and so read the situation that i find, i think i'm and i might be the only person who feels it is about nothing is being done to rein in these government agencies. and so from my perspective it's like, well, the only privacy really have is what the government says that you have to. and i was really pumped when you voted against -- that was awesome, i was really happy about that. i was really disappointed that you voted against
was the nsa and their search of the american e-mail and the compiling of metadata about the phone calls of americans. collects relations have come to light recently that there were times when the line was crossed. that demonstrates that those mechanisms were in place and the court ruling that that program was unconstitutional in 2011 and setting it aside and ending it was another example of how the process works. we have to continue to focus on striking that balance. >> missile controversy seems to have done something that a lot of people were not thought possible. that is forging a common ground between the libertarians and the liberal side of the democratic party. you get a sense that this is going to be the kind of the finding issue going forward that may be, say, the iraq war was? >> i do not have a sense that this will be a defining issue in that way. as is particularly because unlike the iraq war, where president bush was in office and very affirmatively differed with the democratic base and with face of the entire country where most americans felt that with the wrong war at the w
of tennessee. she's also chair of the judicial conference of the nsa's committee on the budget, and so is well and deeply first and funding issues faced by the court and can answer i believe many of the implicit questions raised in the opening statement from both myself and senator sessions. judge gibbons, please proceed. >> chairman coons, senator sessions, members of the subcommittee, i appear before you as chair of the judicial conference committee on the budget. the judiciary very much appreciates the invitation to discuss the financial crisis facing the courts. senator coons, i am pleased that judge is a known circuit are here today. i see judge ted mickey. there's the judge from your home state. the third circuit itself -- as rest of the judiciary but it's within the circuit coordination and efforts to address the current crisis has been stellar. i also would like to recognize judge john bates right here behind me, the new director of the administrative office of the court who comes after serving on the d.c. federal district court. the $350 million, 5% across the board sequestration cuts
the ramification of the nsa/prism issue as that continues to be a topic of concern in europe. russia will clearly be a topic ask be, of course, syria, egypt, the middle east and the unrest there. so i believe you'll see a very fulsome bilateral conversation within the nordic state, and i think it's an excellent preparation to get the president ready as he travels to st. petersburg to meet with his g8 -- g20, excuse me, colleagues. and, matt, i'll let you take the baton. >> let me introduce matt really quickly. matt goodman holds our william simon chair in political economy. the sigh hon chair examines current issues this international economic policy with a lahr focus on the asia pacific. but i should also say that matt previously served as the white house coordinator for the east asia summit, for the asia-pacific summit many, but he also served as director on the nsc staff and was responsible for the g20, g8 and other international forums. and with that, i'd like to introduce my colleague, matt goodman. >> thank you, ann i drew. hank, heather. so the president will be participating in the eighth
nation's surveillance programs have helped thwart terrorist attacks because of the n.s.a. and f.b.i. personnel who work on these activities every day and working hard to comply with the law to protect our constitutional liberties and keep america safe. and contrast to the efforts of those hardworking, law-abidinging personnel, americans have serious reservations about attorney general holder and clapper who have -- who are ultimately responsible for the management of these programs. we remain gravely concerned about their lack to follow the law, be forthright with the american people and congress, and commitment to protect our actually guaranteed liberties. continued congressional oversight coupled with the terminations of clapper and holder will help restore these fight terrorism without compromising our liberties or creating gaps in our intelligence structure. in addition the removal may start the healing process to restore america's trust in our federal government. thank you, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. for what purpose does the gentleman from
the relationship, especially in light of what has happened with edward snowden and the nsa that relationship between the foreign spacing components of the american government, and its relationship to owners and operators of critical infrastructure who traditionally operate domestically. >> there are a few trend that are important, underpinnings of your question. first of all, over the last decade, increasingly the department of defense relies on facilities here in the united states in order to operate our forces abroad, and so when you look at the dependence of dod facilities, military bases here, on privately owned infrastructure, especially the electric grid, you can see the imperative for dod to be able to partner effectively, not only with industry to assure the flow of those vital electricity services, but of course also with the department of energy and the department of homeland security, which will always be in the lead for the federal government. never the department of defense force these kinds of issues. so, building industry collaboration under the leadership and the federal team
the republican party. you see it manifest in various debates. you see it in the debate about n.s.a. insure veeps -- surveillance program. you see it with aid to egypt. there's no question what rand paul is leading the movement for a very different kind of republican foreign policy. i don't know who's going to prevail in that debate. we'll know when the republicans choose a nominee in 2016. host: go to john in minnesota on our republican line. caller: i was wondering why israel doesn't get involved? we pour all the money into israel. seem like this is more concerning them than us. they just sit back and don't do anything. just take our money. it's because of dick cheney and the neocons that we can't get coalition that the rest of the world don't trust us because of iraq. host: what is israel doing now? guest: israel is doing what they ought to be doing. most of the world would want them to do is stand on the sidelines and their producting themselves and preparing themselves in case syria decides it use chemical weapons against them. i don't know anybody including critics of the president, wa
. as we all witnessed over the last few months here, with the nsa and what has happened to our computers, cell phones, and information being stored, this appears to be another technology that could be abused a bit. i think if we do not have more laws in place there could be some very serious concerns in regards to these unmanned vehicles. guest: ross, i has an individual, understand the concern from a big data standpoint about how data is collected, stored, disseminated and destroyed. that is what you are talking about. this technology, unmanned systems, has a large capacity to make everyone's life better. that is a tremendous upside you have to this technology. the technology is agnostic to the issue you are talking to. it is a different issue when talking about this capability. if you have ever had a situation with fires, floods or natural disasters -- 80% of all firefighters are volunteer. you want to make sure those men and women have the best tools for them to use when they execute the job they are given to do. in many cases, other people's lives are on the line. i understand your c
of the recent nsa disclosures that we're learning about is, you know, if you don't have members of congress and the u.s., the american people knowing about what the government is doing and the kind of extraordinary power they want to make the country safe, then, you know, you do risk the sense this will just be the kind of permanent war that will never end, and you will never be able to grapple, and that creates a national security bureaucracy. but that said, the idea that you just want to -- you know, if you were to say that we should repeal that aumf, then you would effectively be saying you don't think there currently is a war, and as tom said, the enemy gets a vote, and they're still at war with us. that's kind of where i'm at. >> let me just throw into the discussion, i'm pretty sure president obama suggested before the closing of the diplomatic outposts that the authorization for the use of military force, that congress should consider repealing it. but again, that -- >> or modifying it. >> or modifying it. very different, i guess. the idea of repealing it would be based on the narrat
asylum former nsa contractor edward snowden. speaker john boehner also talked about the budget process in this 10 minute briefing. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> good morning, everyone. yesterday i met with the house chairman leading the investigation on benghazi. the chairman has been doing good work, much of it behind the again, but i stress once that we need to get to the bottom of what happened that terrible night, why it happened, and how we can prevent similar tragedies in the future. are also continuing to investigate the irs for its abusive power. there is nothing phony about these scandals, mr. president. when four americans are dead, not when the agency when enforcing your health care law has been harassing because of their political beliefs. the american people deserve answers and we will continue to fight for the truth, no matter how badly the administration wants to sweep these issues under the carpet. learned thatk, we our economy continues to muddle along at an unacceptable pace. this is
the relationship especially in light of what's happened with edward snowden and the nsa, that relationship with, between the foreign-facing come poems, the national security facing come poems of the american be government and its relationship to owners and operators of critical infrastructure who traditionally operate domestically? >> well, there are two trends, scott, that are important. upside pinnings of your -- underpinnings of your question. first of all, oh the last decade -- over the last decade increasing lu the department of defense relies on facilities here in the united states in order to operate our forces abroad. and so when you look at the dependence of dod facilities, military bases here on privately-owned infrastructure, especially the electric grid for purposes of today, you can see the imperative for dod to be able to partner effectively not only with industry to assure the flow of those vital electricity services, but, of course, also with the department of energy and the department of homeland security which will always be with in the lead for the federal government, never t
surveillance may be broader than has been disclosed. a report in the "wall street journal" says the nsa is able to cover 75% of all u.s. internet communications. the agency is interested in messages that either begin or end outside the country, but their capacity is so broad that solely domestic communications can be swept up in the net. today in maryland army private first class bradley manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison and was dishonorably discharged he had been convicted of leaking hundreds of thousands of classified documents in what has been called the largest such leak of secret files in history. >> a teacher who ordered her kindergartners to hit a fellow student has been sentenced to 30 days in jail and two years probation. cynthia ambrose wanted to teach a 6-year-old boy what it felt like to be bullied so she lined up the kids to slab him. the school district suspended ambrose in may of last year. >>> the pitcher who beaned alex rodriguez has been fine and suspended. the incident on national tv has been ruled intentional. red sox's ryan dempster will miss five games and pay an
-span.org. he was also asked about the nsa surveillance program. >> each night this weekend c-span2, while congress is on break, we're showing on four presentations of q&a. today, nobel peace prize winner jody williams. she won the prize in 1997 for her efforts towards a worldwide ban on landmines. then at 8 p.m. eastern booktv prime time. tonight, the focus is on what booktv viewers are reading this summer. >> over this congressional recess, the service employees international union is lobbying to convince congress to pass immigration reform. this morning from washington to talk with one of the union's leaders about why they're doing that. this is about half an hour. >> host: our focus is immigration and our guest is eliseo medina who is the secretary-treasurer of the service employees international union. thanks so much for being with us. >> guest: thank you so much for having me. >> host: as a look at the debate over immigration and it is front and center in the august recess as members of congress traveled to the respective states and congressional districts, what do you think the immi
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